Middle Class Consumers: “Opportunities Unlimited” ~ 1955 LIFE & Fortune Magazines; Animated Graphic Cartoon

Support this channel: https://paypal.me/jeffquitney OR https://www.patreon.com/jeffquitney more at http://quickfound.net/ Economic overview of the rise of the “middle income consumer.” Produced for Time, Inc. by Transfilm. Originally a public domain film, slightly cropped to remove uneven edges, with the aspect ratio…

Middle Class Consumers: "Opportunities Unlimited" ~ 1955 LIFE & Fortune Magazines; Animated Graphic Cartoon

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Support this channel: https://paypal.me/jeffquitney OR https://www.patreon.com/jeffquitney

more at http://quickfound.net/

Economic overview of the rise of the “middle income consumer.” Produced for Time, Inc. by Transfilm.

Originally a public domain film, slightly cropped to remove uneven edges, with the aspect ratio corrected, and one-pass brightness-contrast-color correction & mild video noise reduction applied.
The soundtrack was also processed with volume normalization, noise reduction, clipping reduction, and/or equalization (the resulting sound, though not perfect, is far less noisy than the original).

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Middle_class
Wikipedia license: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/

The middle class is a class of people in the middle of a social hierarchy. The very definition of the term “middle class” is highly political and vigorously contested by various schools of political and economic philosophy. Modern social theorists – and especially economists (with widely divergent open and hidden political motivations behind their arguments) – have defined and re-defined the term “middle class” in order to serve their particular political ends. The definitions of the term “middle class” therefore are the result of the more- or less-scientific methods used when delineating the parameters of what is and isn’t “middle class”.

In Weberian socioeconomic terms, the middle class is the broad group of people in contemporary society who fall socio-economically between the working class and upper class. The common measures of what constitutes middle class vary significantly among cultures. One of the narrowest definitions limits it to those in the middle fifth of the nation’s income ladder. A wider characterization includes everyone but the poorest 20% and the wealthiest 20%.

In modern American vernacular usage, the term “middle class” is most often used as a self-description by those persons whom academics and Marxists would otherwise identify as the working class which are below both the upper class and the true middle class, but above those in poverty. This leads to considerable ambiguity over the meaning of the term “middle class” in American usage. Sociologists such as Dennis Gilbert and Joseph Kahl see this American self-described “middle class” (i.e. working class) as the most populous class in the United States

In February 2009, The Economist asserted that over half the world’s population now belongs to the middle class, as a result of rapid growth in emerging countries. It characterized the middle class as having a reasonable amount of discretionary income, so that they do not live from hand to mouth as the poor do, and defined it as beginning at the point where people have roughly a third of their income left for discretionary spending after paying for basic food and shelter. This allows people to buy consumer goods, improve their health care, and provide for their children’s education. Most of the emerging middle class consists of people who are middle-class by the standards of the developing world but not the rich one, since their money incomes do not match developed country levels, but the percentage of it which is discretionary does. By this definition, the number of middle-class people in Asia exceeded that in the West sometime around 2007 or 2008…

The American middle class is smaller than middle classes across Western Europe, but its income is higher, according to a recent Pew Research Center analysis of the U.S. and 11 European nations.

The median disposable (after-tax) income of middle-class households in the U.S. was $60,884 in 2010. With the exception of Luxembourg – a virtual city-state where the median income was $71,799 – the disposable incomes of middle-class households in the other 10 Western European countries in the study trailed well behind the American middle class.

The numbers below reflect the middle, upper, and lower share of all adults by country by net wealth (not income). Middle class is defined here for the US as those adults with a net wealth of between USD 50,000 and USD 500,000 in mid 2015. Purchasing power parity is used to adjust these number for other countries. Unlike that of the upper class, wealth of the middle and lowest quintile consists substantially of non-financial assets, specifically home equity. Factors which explain differences in home equity include housing prices and home ownership rates. According to the OECD, the vast majority of financial assets in every country analysed is found in the top of the wealth distribution…

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